The Center created the Northern Forest Board Forum to help build leadership and provide organizational development training for leaders of forest products business to collectively advance their businesses.

Board Forum webMeetings are not lectures, but forums where members contribute their experience, perspective and skill to assist and reflect upon each other’s business issues and opportunities. Discussions are solution-seeking and focused on CEO‐level issues including: the unique challenges and pressures CEOs face in running a growing business, strategic and business planning, managing people, succession planning, leadership development, customer and competitive pressures, new market opportunities and industry dynamics, and leveraging financing for growth and investment.

The Forum is a leadership peer advisory group that benefits from monthly, in-person, facilitated half-day meetings, open houses, tours and learning at member businesses, webinars and conference calls on specific topics, and ongoing access to business coaching, technical assistance and peer support.

The Forum is designed for CEOs, business owners, or senior leadership of small to midsize private wood products companies located in the Northern Forest.

Facilitators Jim McHugh and James Buchanan are highly respected and experienced facilitators who bring experience as CEOs and diverse backgrounds. In addition, Dave Redmond, director of Wood Products Initiatives for the Northern Forest Center, provides technical assistance and access to additional resources for wood products companies and participates in select meetings.

Availability of the Forum fluctuates based on funding for the program. To express interest in participating in a future Forum series, or to learn more about the program, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

ShackletonThomas—Bridgewater, VT

Shackleton workshop webCraftsmanship builds a brand for fine furniture makers, and good business management keeps them in production. This is what motivated the Northern Forest Center to team up with Vermont home furnishings maker ShackletonThomas, providing both technical assistance and a small grant to help the owners make smart choices that will change their approach to business management.

The Center’s director of wood product initiatives, Dave Redmond, first met with Miranda Thomas and Charles Shackleton, owners of the company, when he was visiting important furniture makers in the Northern Forest region. 

Shackleton Thomas Furniture webThe Bridgewater, VT, company employs 15 full- and part-time staff and uses over 6,000 board feet of wood from mills located around the region. ShackletonThomas has strong brand recognition in New England and the Chicago area—Miranda designed pottery for gifts for President Barack Obama and Pope John Paul II—which was one of many reasons Dave had interest in starting an Innovation project with them. 

Dave's insight and technical experience—his career spans 30 years in banking and management in wood products manufacturing—helped him build a relationship with the owners and consult on improvements to their business model. 

Dave worked with Sophie Shackleton, Miranda and Charles’s daughter, as she consulted for her family's business for a few months to help her parents in their commitment to increase productivity, find cost savings, and manage their budget. “Sophie brought a fresh perspective to business management,” said Dave. Sophie leaned on Dave's expertise as she swiftly implemented changes.

Sophie and Charlie Shackleton web caption “Dave was consistently present, checking in and pushing me on implementation,” said Sophie. “He offered realistic advice, and his encouragement gave me the courage to press on. The progress we have made owes a huge thank you to Dave’s persistent advice and the Northern Forest Center’s involvement.”

ShackletonThomas remains committed to producing high-quality, well-crafted furniture that relies on handwork. Hugh Shackleton, workshop manager as well as Miranda and Charles's son, was a stand-out as a young artist. At the family business, the combination of his design experience and sales skills help  maintain the excellence of their product. 

The work the Center has done with ShackletonThomas to identify cost saving measures will make space for other business priorities, such as reaching more customers with online marketing. This and other projects with wood product manufacturers is shoring up good, quality jobs with benefits in Vermont and other Northern Forest states. 

KBS Builders—South Paris, Maine

KBS Builders employs 146 people at its plants in South Paris and Waterford, Maine. The company manufactures about 250 modular houses a year, ranging from ranches to multi-family homes. Operations Manager Ryan MacEachern said that the major challenge for KBS Builders is to improve technology and to overcome the lack of skilled workers available.

“We’ve committed to organizational change with regards to lean manufacturing and putting all employees through training for Lean 101,” he said. “It’s a huge financial and time commitment for us.”

The core principle of lean manufacturing is to eliminate all waste in the manufacturing process, and “waste” is anything that does not add to the value of the product from the customer’s perspective. Lean projects often improve layout, speed production, eliminate wasted steps, and smooth the work flow throughout a plant. Wayne Messer, senior project manager at the Androscoggin Valley Council of Governments (AVCOG) and the Maine Manufacturing Extension Partnership (Maine MEP), is providing the lean manufacturing expertise to the KBS Builders project, and the Center has covered almost half the cost.

“We’ve done a lot to change the shop layout, and it’s made us more efficient,” said MacEachern. “We’re introducing new technology. The first step is a new CNC lumber saw, which we’re just learning to use. We also changed our design software to go with the new saw.

“Our long-term goal is to add on product lines and increase output. The Center’s help has been hugely important from a financial perspective. Dave shows his passion for what we’re doing, and it motivates us," said MacEachern, referring to Dave Redmond, director of forest product innovations for the Center. "He sees the changes more clearly than we do, because he’s not seeing it every day.”

The Center supports innovation in the wood products industry with a combination of in-house expertise from Dave Redmond, whose career spans 30 years in manufacturing and banking—and financial assistance through a matching grant program to enable companies to contract with the experts they need to make big changes in their companies.

The program has been supported by the Northern Border Regional Commission, the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Rural Development, the U.S. Economic Development Administration, the U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities, the Sewall Foundation, Maine Timberlands Charitable Trust, other foundations and private contributions.

This article was originally featured in the 2017 Bangor Daily News special issue on the forest products industry (see pp. 12-13).

Stratton Lumber—Stratton, Maine

The Stratton Lumber mill yard sprawls across 85 acres in the village of Stratton, at the southwestern tip of Flagstaff Lake. It processes millions of board feet of softwood construction lumber annually.

General Manager Jed Whiting said a typical week sees about 100 log trucks coming in and another 90-100 going out with finished product, in addition to 100 trucks with residual material from milling. “We need to get different streams of product where they need to be, efficiently. Both incoming and outgoing trucks,” said Whiting. “We need to create an environment that allows everybody to do their work in most efficient way possible.”

Wayne Messer, senior project manager at the Androscoggin Valley Council of Governments (AVCOG) and the Maine Manufacturing Extension Partnership (Maine MEP), worked with Stratton Lumber to develop a new workflow for the lumber yard based on lean manufacturing principles, with half the cost paid by the Center’s grant program.

“When we implement the plan, it will allow us to increase our production,” said Whiting. “Our goal is to more efficiently manage our current level of business and to increase in the future without increasing our acreage.”

Stratton Lumber sources all its spruce and fir from local loggers and its own log yards throughout New England. The nearly 400 weekly truck loads going in and out of the mill are run by owner-operators and truck brokerages, so the mill’s economic impact flows far across the region.

“If we increase production at the planer mill, it’s good for everybody,” said Whiting. “Being able to do this project has given us interest and insight into how we can implement more lean procedures in other parts of our facility. We’re inspired to use these methods elsewhere.”

The Center supports innovation in the wood products industry with a combination of in-house expertise from Dave Redmond, director of wood products initiatives—whose career spans 30 years in manufacturing and banking—and financial assistance through a matching grant program to enable companies to contract with the experts they need to make big changes in their companies.

The program has been supported by the Northern Border Regional Commission, the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Rural Development, the U.S. Economic Development Administration, the U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities, the Sewall Foundation, Maine Timberlands Charitable Trust, other foundations and private contributions.

This article was originally featured in the 2017 Bangor Daily News special issue on the forest products industry (see pp. 12-13).

Katahdin Cedar Log Homes—Oakfield, Maine

With 82 employees, Katahdin Cedar Log Homes in Oakfield is the second largest employer in southern Aroostook County, and owner David Gordon understands that many people beyond his own family depend on the success of his business.

The Center has helped Gordon with two projects, first funding experts to help him with an efficiency plan for a new sawmill, and later working with him on a succession plan for the business. Dave Redmond, director of forest product innovations for the Center, also helped connect the company to new outlets for the cedar residuals that come from manufacturing.

“The Center understands how important these mills are to the region,” said Gordon. “Dave has helped me tap into new markets because of his contacts throughout New England. It’s very helpful to have his level of industry knowledge.”

Gordon’s father established the family business in the 1970s, and Gordon is planning now for the transition to his own son, Gabe, who lives 250 miles away in Berwick, Maine. Jim McHugh of McHugh & Company is helping develop a multi-year succession plan to reorganize company leadership and transition to Gabe Gordon’s eventual management. “We’re learning what the pitfalls have been for others,” said David Gordon. “We’ve got our radar up so we won’t make the same mistakes. We’ve got to have the proper people in place, and really understand the financial ramifications of our decisions.”

The Center supports innovation in the wood products industry with a combination of in-house expertise from Dave Redmond, director of wood products initiatives—whose career spans 30 years in manufacturing and banking—and financial assistance through a matching grant program to enable companies to contract with the experts they need to make big changes in their companies.

The program has been supported by the Northern Border Regional Commission, the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Rural Development, the U.S. Economic Development Administration, the U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities, the Sewall Foundation, Maine Timberlands Charitable Trust, other foundations and private contributions.

This article was originally featured in the 2017 Bangor Daily News special issue on the forest products industry (see pp. 12-13).

Appalachian Engineered Flooring—North Troy, Vermont

In less than 18 months’ time, a small wood products manufacturer in northern Vermont embraced a series of innovation initiatives to completely turn around the company—achieving consistent profitability and sustaining quality jobs for rural Vermont residents.

Appalachian Engineered Flooring began operations in North Troy, Vermont, in 2012.  The company’s owner, Jean Leduc, also owns Appalachian Flooring ltd., a manufacturer of solid hardwood flooring located in Cowansville, Quebec.

In the spring of 2014, Jean Leduc and Appalachian Engineered Flooring General Manager Jennifer Fraser concluded that the company was facing significant obstacles that went beyond normal startup challenges. Challenges in the company culture were causing staff turnover at a rate of 1 to 3 people a month in a company of approximately 20 employees. Morale was low and there was no predictability regarding production or financials.

Transformational Organizational Development

To their credit, Jean and Jennifer realized that major changes were urgently needed.  In May of 2014, the Northern Forest Center introduced them to Jeff Howe through the Center’s Wood Products Innovation program. Jeff is founder and president of Minneapolis-based Dovetail Partners and is—in the Center’s view—the nation’s leading expert in helping wood products companies implement organizational development initiatives that can transform a company.  Transformational Organizational Development focuses on:

  • Creating a culture of change that supports innovation, promotes effective workplace communication, encourages teamwork, resolves conflicts and encourages personal growth; and
  • Implementing effective planning processes, including marketing, operating, financial and human resource plans.

Jeff Howe has been one of the Center’s key partners in implementing its Wood Products Innovation program, assisting a number of companies with transformational organizational development, with the Center covering half of the cost.

“A key step was understanding the changes we needed to make. Jeff’s guidance has allowed us to make remarkable progress in one year,” said Jennifer.

At Appalachian Engineered Flooring, Jeff assisted with a transformation that focused on company culture, company values, internal communication, and conflict resolution. The changes resulted in dramatic improvements in employee morale, attendance, and a sense of commitment to the team.  The employee base has stabilized, and employee productivity has improved measurably.  The company made significant improvements in its hiring process, so that new employees fit well within the new company culture.

Lean Manufacturing

While Jeff’s work with the company continued, the improvements in company culture were significant enough by December 2014 that Appalachian Engineered Flooring was able to begin implementing a significant Lean Manufacturing initiative, fully embraced by the company’s employees. Everyone pitches in with ideas for improvement.

“Our Lean work has had a direct financial benefit. We’re producing the right stuff at the right time at the right quality for customers, and that equals profit,” said Jennifer. “We’ve learned how to be smarter about what we’re doing.”

The Vermont Manufacturing Extension Center (VMEC) has been assisting Appalachian Engineered Flooring with its lean transformation, with the Northern Forest Center covering half of the cost.  Results to date include:

  • Dramatic increase in productivity
  • Reduced lead time from 3 weeks to 4 days
  • Reduced inventory by almost  half
  • Consistent profitability

Skilled Workforce Initiative

This year, Appalachian Engineered Flooring also began implementing the Northern Forest Center’s Skilled Workforce Initiative for Wood Manufacturing. The Center’s partner in the Skilled Workforce Initiative, the Woodwork Career Alliance (WCA), worked with Appalachian Engineered Flooring to develop new Skill Standards on a number of machines not previously included in WCA’s Skill Standards. WCA trained senior company employees as In-House Evaluators, and the company used the Skill Standards to help create a new company training manual.

All manufacturing employees began participating in the in-house training program in the spring of 2015, and have been enrolled in WCA’s Woodwork Passport program. In August, WCA performed an audit that certified each employee’s level of proficiency on various machines. Those certifications are recorded in the employee’s Woodwork Passport. 

The Skilled Workforce Initiative fits well with the other initiatives being implemented by Appalachian Engineered Flooring. For example, the systematic training and credentialing of employees enhances company culture. In addition, the Skill Standards are helping to define “standard work,” which is an important concept in Lean Manufacturing. And the cross training of company employees directly helps make Lean processes more effective.

The improvements in company culture, Lean processes, and employee training have positioned the company to take advantage of growth opportunities. Already sales have been increased by 17%, and the company believes that is just the beginning. The initiatives have helped put the company on a path for long term success and continued growth.

J.K. Adams—Dorset, Vermont

A 70-year-old wood products manufacturer in southern Vermont is using Lean Manufacturing to improve its manufacturing process and customer service, paving the way for future growth.

J.K. Adams Co. manufactures wooden cutting boards, appetizer plates, kitchen storage products, rolling pins, wine racks and other wood products for cooking and entertaining. The company employs approximately 50 people in Dorset, Vermont.

CEO Jon Blatchford has identified substantial opportunities for J.K. Adams to grow its sales, but he concluded that the company must significantly increase its manufacturing efficiency to take advantage of these opportunities. Jon and his management team determined that Lean Manufacturing would be central to addressing this challenge and knew that for Lean to be successful, employee buy-in to the program was essential. By early 2015, Jon concluded that improvements in company culture meant that the company was ready for a successful Lean implementation.

The Northern Forest Center assisted J.K. Adams in helping the company determine the most effective way to initiate a significant Lean Manufacturing initiative. In March of 2015, the Vermont Manufacturing Extension Center began providing expertise and guidance to J.K. Adams on its Lean initiative. The Northern Forest Center is covering half of the cost, using funds secured by the Vermont Wood Manufacturers Association (VWMA) from Vermont’s Working Lands Enterprise Fund.

“Our company is only seven months into our Lean journey, but already we are seeing important improvements,” said Jon. “These benefits will only increase over time as we move forward on our continuous improvement initiative through Lean.”

The first step of the initiative was to create a baseline of knowledge for all company employees, so VMEC organized and conducted a “Fundamentals of Lean 101” class for all the employees at J.K. Adams.

The second step mapped and diagrammed the manufacturing process through an exercise in Value Stream Mapping, which identified ways to improve the manufacturing process. The mapping revealed that although raw materials traveled 600 feet through 5 operations to become a finished product, employees were walking a full mile to get the job done. By moving tools around, and by making more efficient use of routers and scanners, the company was able to reduce employee walking distance by two-thirds or more.

As part of examining work flow, the company realized that some machines were used very infrequently and could be taken off the floor, or made portable to be available when needed. By making these types of changes, the company freed up enough space to be able to relocate the design team, which had been working in a separate building about five miles away, to the main facility so that the entire team will be located in one facility.

J.K. Adams has now begun to apply lean principles to its administrative side, and is using Lean principles to improve the efficiency of their customer service operations.

The company is also pursuing product development ideas to enhance the growth opportunities made possible by its Lean initiative. Jon Blatchford views the product development focus and the Lean focus as going hand in hand, with Lean making the company more nimble.

Maine Wood Concepts—New Vineyard, Maine

In New Vineyard, Maine, a company called Maine Wood Concepts turns out everything from wooden nickels to chopsticks to yo-yos to parts for wooden trains—and so much more—supplying many other wood products manufacturing companies. The business has been in the Fletcher family since 1971, and has worked hard to adapt to changing markets and international competition. In 2012, Maine Wood Concepts launched a major expansion when it acquired the rights to a line of gourmet kitchen products from famed drumstick maker Vic Firth.

Maine Wood Concepts President Douglas Fletcher estimates they’ve made about a million different specific items, and each of them in great quantity. The company is an important employer in rural western Maine, about 15 minutes north of Farmington, where it employed about 75 workers before acquiring the rights to the kitchen product line, which it rebranded as Fletchers’ Mills.

The Center began helping Maine Wood Concepts in 2011 with financial and technical support through our Wood Products Innovation program. The Fletcher brothers wanted to update their management approach and organizational structure to keep the company growing. The Center brought in industry expert Jeff Howe of Dovetail Partners to help Maine Wood Concepts change company culture and structure to reach their goals.

To succeed in its expansion, Maine Woods Concepts had to hire about 30 new employees all at once—a 40% increase in jobs at the plant—to produce all the new kitchen products. And the expansion continues. In a feature in Northern Woodlands magazine, Doug Fletcher said Maine Wood Concepts is looking to add jobs, to expand its machine shop and research and development capacity.

The company won the Pine Tree award from the Maine Wood Products Association in 2013 in recognition of its innovation and strength in the industry. Receiving the award, Doug Fletcher told the crowd that without the help of the Center and Jeff Howe’s guidance, the company could not have managed the expansion and successfully absorbed all of the new employees. “They’re helping a very traditional business sector find new ways to be successful in a global economy.”

Read more about Maine Woods Concepts:

Northern Woodlands magazine

Maine Biz

To shop the new Fletchers’ Mill line of kitchen products: www.fletchersmill.com (click on item pictures to see details and add to shopping cart).

Wood products manufacturing—a valued tradition in the Northern Forest—provides jobs to more than 20,000 people in Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont and northern New York. The industry remains an important part of our forest-based economy even as it faces ongoing stress from overseas competition and an aging workforce. Wood products manufacturing creates markets for wood, which helps forestland owners keep forests as forests, and supports employment for loggers, truckers and related workers.

The Center is helping the industry hone its competitive advantage through two initiatives so it can continue to provide good jobs in our communities. The Transformational Innovation Program provides financial support and technical assistance to help wood products manufacturers implement innovations that can profoundly change their businesses. 

nfc-wood-products-2small-photos

nfc testimonial Doug Fletcher

"We couldn't have so successfully achieved our recent expansion—including absorbing 40 new employees—without the assistance of the Center and Jeff Howe. They're helping a very traditional business sector find new ways to be successful in a global economy."

—Doug Fletcher, owner, Maine Wood Concepts

 

Explore some of the Northern Forest's extraordinary wood product businesses here.

Transformational Innovation

The Center offers consulting and financial support to help manufacturers adopt innovations that can transform their companies, making them more competitive and helping to secure and expand the number of jobs they provide. The initiative focuses on changes that can make a major difference for the company—such as Lean Manufacturing,Mass Customization, and Transformational Organizational Development.

Financial support for projects in Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont and northern New York can range up to $20,000, covering up to half the cost of using outside expertise to pursue key innovations. Smaller projects are also welcome. Our team will work with companies to help  identify projects that have the most potential for transformational change. Funding opportunities vary depending on timing and restrictions of the grants supporting this program. Please inquire to find out whether funding is available for your area.

The Center has compiled a group of national and local experts able to assist with innovations. Please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to explore potential financial support to help your wood products business thrive.

Innovation Profile: Read how Maine Wood Concepts used the Innovation Program to update its management approach and organizational structure. Read more.

Explore some of the Northern Forest's extraordinary wood product businesses here.

Northern Forest Board Forum

In response to requests for leadership and organizational development training, the Center created the Northern Forest Board Forum to provide a new vehicle for leaders of forest products business to collectively advance their businesses.The Forum is designed for CEOs, business owners, or senior leadership of small to midsize private wood products companies located in the Northern Forest.

The Center is focusing on three types of innovations that can transform today’s wood products companies: Lean Manufacturing, Mass Customization and Transformational Organizational Development.

The Center offers financial and technical assistance to manufacturers in Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont and northern New York to implement these and potentially other transformational innovations. Financial assistance ranges up to $20,000 (or more in extraordinary cases) and can provide up to half the cost of hiring outside experts. Our team will work with companies to help identify innovation projects that have the most potential for transformational change, and can make referrals to top experts.

Please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to explore potential financial support.

Lean Manufacturing

Lean is an effective tool for increasing profitability through increased efficiency and customer satisfaction, for positioning the company for significant growth, and for saving and creating jobs. Successful Lean implementation is also an important component of a successful implementation of a Mass Customization business model.

NFC mass customization

Properly implemented, Lean Manufacturing has been shown to substantially increase quality control and labor productivity, and dramatically reduce manufacturing lead times and inventory and related costs.

Lean Manufacturing uses a series of proven principles and tools designed to eliminate or minimize waste in manufacturing due to over-production, unnecessary inventory, over-processing, waiting, unnecessary movement of products and employees, and product rejects.

The proven methods, tools and concepts that are associated with Lean can be applied in virtually every aspect of the company. To create lasting transformation, Lean needs to be an ongoing process with leadership from management and buy-in from employees. It is critical to integrate Lean thinking as part of a company’s culture.

Additional resources for Lean Manufacturing.

Please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to discuss potential assistance for Lean Manufacturing.

Mass Customization

Mass Customization uses advances in manufacturing and information technology to produce made-to-order items that are tailored to the customer’s needs, but are manufactured with cost efficiency and short lead times. The customer typically has access to an on-line design and visualization tool engineered to work in tandem with a back office process that generates a list of materials and parts for production.

Mass Customization is not traditional mass production. Nor is it craft production. It combines the best features of both while minimizing drawbacks. Mass Customization is a great strategy to combat overseas competition.

The increase in consumer online product research and purchasing gives manufacturers an excellent opportunity to evolve toward Mass Customization, personalization and co-creation strategies. These strategies give customers more options without compromising efficiency or quick delivery. Some pioneers in this field include Dell Computer and myAdidas.

With the exception of the kitchen cabinet industry, the U.S. wood products industry has generally been slow to take advantage of Mass Customization opportunities. The Center’s initiative is beginning to change that in our region. Whether it’s business-to- business or business-to-consumer, Mass Customization is a good strategy to combat competition, better attract and serve customers, achieve higher margins and other benefits.

Additional resources for Mass Customization.

Please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to discuss potential assistance for Mass Customization.

Transformational Organizational Development

The leadership skills of key individuals in a wood products company regarding planning, communication, facilitation, collaboration, and conflict resolution are critical to company success. Dramatically improving these skills can greatly enhance performance and position a company to implement future innovations.

NFC Company Culture

Transformational Organizational Development focuses on:

  • Implementing effective and systematic planning, including marketing, operating, financial and human resource plans
  • Creating a culture of change that supports innovation, encourages teamwork, resolves conflicts and encourages personal growth

Additional resources for Organizational Development.

Please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to discuss potential assistance for your Organizational Development project.